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PODCAST: This Moved Me

138: Jason Freeman – On Owning Your Voice

Jason Freeman – a writer, public-speaker and Bravery Coach. His love of self and openness are some of the many superpowers he has as a speaker. He talks a lot about how the self-imposed limitations in our minds may prevent us from creating extraordinary lives. Jason himself has had to overcome hurdles in his mind, including not allowing his speech impediment to prevent him from using his voice to share his message. It’s such a pleasure and honor to know you, Jason!

 

 


PODCAST: The C Method

‘Daily Bravery’ & Learning To Love Your Own Voice w/ Jason Freeman [Episode 78]

Do you ‘hate’ your own voice? Are you your own worst critic? And as a result, do you hold yourself back from going after great opportunities?

My guest this week has an inspiring story to share with you. His name is Jason Freeman, and as a Bravery Coach and Inspirational Speaker, he helps people to learn to love their own voice and express themselves with confidence, clarity and ease. But what’s most remarkable is the transformation Jason went through to get there. At birth, he created a bit of a ruckus and lost oxygen in the process. As he grew, he developed a one-of-a-kind accent commonly called a speech impediment. Also as a kid, he had substantial coordination difficulties. Jason spent much of his life strongly disliking not being “normal.” Even though he was often seeing the best in other people through his former work helping people with developmental disabilities, he was still often seeing the worst in himself. Eventually, he discovered that constant self-criticism is draining and destructive. About seven years ago, desperate for a change, he went to a yoga class and then another and another and then lots more. He began to fall in love with his body and his voice.

 

 

 

PODCAST: Rebel Entreprenuer Show

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Rebel Radio 003: Denis Nurmela & Mr. Speech Impediment, Jason Freeman


INTERVIEW: Ronald Couming

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Ronald Couming Interviews Jason Freeman 9-12-16

Ronald Couming interviewing Jason Freeman who discusses overcoming personally perceived limitations and handicaps, by embracing imperfections to propel you to success and happiness using his 5 R’s. On the Internet Marketing and Business Solutions, with Ronald Couming, (of RCS Technology Solutions) radio show, WCAP Mondays 11am-12pm EST, Streamed live over the internet on Tunein Radio as well.


RADIO: I Love Life with Jerry Dahmen 

KXRB Classic Country 1000 – Sioux Falls

While visiting his hometown, Jason Freeman stopped in to Sioux Falls very own KXRB – Classic Country 1000 and shared his unique perspective on “I Love Life with Jerry Dahmen”.

 

 

PODCAST: EOFire with John Lee Dumas


1253: Why YOUR unique voice is one of your biggest assets with Jason Freeman

After struggling with a speech impediment most of his life, Jason came to realize his unique voice is one of his biggest assets. Now he speaks on major stages and coaches others to share their heart-felt truth.


PODCAST: Mark My Words! with Mark Schall


Catching Basketballs with My Glasses!

Mark interviews Jason Freeman.  Jason is a man who desperately tried for most of his life to hide his highly pronounced speech impediment.  Born with Cerebral Palsy, and now out of hiding, Jason speaks to a wide range of audiences about cultivating the courage to be fully themselves.  Most recently, Jason spoke to an engaged audience of 800.  Quite an accomplishment for someone who, in 7th grade, barely wanted to say a word because he was so ashamed of his voice and who he was. No longer living in that life paradigm, Jason coaches others to get to the heart of who they are and live their truth.   Jason’s vision for the world is that everyone will have the courage to emerge fully as themselves and delight in exactly who they are.

 

PODCAST: Join Up Dots


482: Jason Freeman: Embracing His Challenges and Loving Life

During the show we discussed such weighty subjects with Jason such as……. How he remembers being a child in seventh grade and bizarrely being worried about the threat of nuclear war. How he learnt through being totally miserable in his life that he loves the peaks in life so much, he wants to ensure that gets more and more of them everyday. How he recalls attempting suicide as a child, until ultimately choosing to live and embracing life, and the possibilities of what he can make of it.

And lastly…..

Why there is nothing to stop any of us doing what we want to do in life, we just need to go out and get it!

 

 

PODCAST: The Inspiration Show (Video)

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Episode # 147 Jason Freeman

 

 

PODCAST: The Rags to Niches Podcast

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3: Speech Impediment to Professional Speaker w/ Jason Freeman

I am very excited for the release of this episode. You’ll get to hear exactly how Jason Freeman went from speech impediment to leaving audiences speechless as a motivational speaker and coach. Jason has also recently appeared on John Lee Dumas’ Podcast “Entrepreneur on fire”. Being born with an handicap is tough, especially when it’s with the number one vehicle of communication(yes speech is, not texting!) However Jason had a choice as we all do. Jason could have easily sat back and collected government checks as many do and there wouldn’t have been anything wrong with that but he chose to separate his fear from who he is as a person and overcome his situation.

 

 

PODCAST: Leaders of Transformation Podcast

 

006: Jason Freeman: Turning Your Limitations Into Your Greatest Blessing

In this episode, Jason shares his story, how he overcame the limiting beliefs he had about himself, and the three personal pillars he lives by today.  Jason’s story is inspiring, insightful and encouraging to anyone to wants to overcome their perceived shortcomings and use them to make a powerful difference in the world.

 

 

PODCAST: YIELD Mastermind Talks


094- Overcoming Adversity w Jason Freeman

Today we have the pleasure of hearing from someone who has overcome major adversity in his life. He not only has dealt with this adversity since birth, but continues to have it challenge him on a daily basis. We all have a TON to learn from Mr. Jason Freeman. Enjoy!

 

 

PODCAST: Leading Edge Parenting (Video)

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 F*ck Normal

Melissa Schwartz talks with Jason Freeman about the pain he experienced as a child who wasn’t “normal” and how he came to love and appreciate his unique voice.

Listen in as we debunk “being normal” and embrace our differences.

 

 

 

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ARTICLE: Project Positive Change

The Magic of Public Speaking

Why battle with your nerves in order to stand in front of a group of people and risk the embarrassment of making mistakes?  It’s absolutely unnecessary as most career paths don’t require public speaking.  Furthermore, we can date, marry and bear children, all without ever having to stare out at a sea of faces looking back at us expectantly . . .

 

ARTICLE: On Being

From My Limitations to Achieving the Extraordinary

When I was in junior high, I longed to craft a path to peace. But I had a few problems. I was just an adolescent. Moreover, I was an adolescent with a disability.

In my haste to be born, I made my entry into the world a few weeks early and startled my folks in the middle of the night. My umbilical cord was pinched like a garden hose during the process, and I lost some oxygen. As a result, I developed a pronounced speech impediment and a few physical coordination issues. These felt like severe limitations in my youth, keeping me from doing anything that would have a meaningful impact on the world . . .

 

ARTICLE: The MIGHTY

What I Would Tell a Child Who Asks Me Why I Talk Funny

If a little kid ever asks me, “Why do you talk funny and move funny?” I hope I respond with this much class:

“You know, I’ve asked that question a lot, too. When I was your age I wanted to be just like the other kids. I wanted to talk as fast as them. I wanted to be understood as well as them. I wanted to be the one scoring the points instead of getting hit in the nose with the basketball. You know?

What I slowly discovered is that wanting to be like Tommy, Joey or Dan only took me farther away from me . . .

 

ARTICLE: The MIGHTY

Why Trying to Be ‘Normal’ Almost Ruined My Life

Ten years ago, I thought I understood myself and the boundaries of my life.

But I’ve always been a little hard to understand, so maybe that should’ve been a red flag . . .


ARTICLE: The MIGHTY

A Letter to the Person Who Judged Me for My Cerebral Palsy

Frankly, I’m used to it. So used to it, I’m almost numb to it. You’ve always judged me for my pronounced speech impediment. I’ve never said my r’s correctly or talked normally at all for that matter. You’ve always judged me for my coordination differences. I’ve caught countless balls with my nose and glasses in my day, but what’s it to you?

This is a horribly hard letter for me to write, but here I am working on it for the second day in a row because I believe healing can come from speaking the truth even if it’s imperfect. This letter will be nothing less than very imperfect, just as I’ve always been.

I’m tired of always feeling like I’m less than what you think I should be. I’m weary of getting sympathy instead of respect. I’m exhausted from trying so hard and never being good enough . . .

 

ARTICLE: The MIGHTY

When I Stopped Using My Cerebral Palsy as Camouflage for My Anxiety

As a result of cerebral palsy, I have a pronounced speech impediment. It’s apparent the moment I open my mouth. And when a person observes me move a little, they’ll notice my coordination differences.

For much of my life, my speech and coordination served as a kind of camouflage I could use to hide my large levels of anxiety. When my anxiety caused me to be afraid of trying something new, I could make my excuse significantly more persuasive by saying it using my different-sounding voice and moving a little to highlight my unique coordination. In third grade, I was able to get out of swim class. In junior high, I spent countless hours watching my friends play video games. Does having a speech impediment and coordination differences mean I’m unable to swim or play video games? No! But I was nervous about looking foolish as I attempted these activities, so I used my voice and coordination as an excuse to avoid giving them a serious try . . .